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Perfect combinations - Bioquell Pod and BQ-50

Gin & tonic. Strawberries & cream. Tea & biscuits. Some things just work together perfectly. Here’s another: Pod & BQ-50.

Now you may be forgiven for raising a slight eyebrow at this new and somewhat unknown ‘perfect combination’ - but over the next couple of years Pod & BQ-50 is likely to be an increasingly high profile winning and unique combination when combating nosocomial infections. Here’s why……

The challenge: Healthcare associated infection and antimicrobial resistance

Hospitals throughout the globe are facing increasingly significant clinical and financial challenges from Healthcare associated infection (HAI) and antibiotic resistance.  It is worth noting that the scale and nature of the HAI challenge depends on where the hospital is located in the world.

Hospitals in the USA and France are predominately made up of single patient rooms – but the rest of the world, including the developing markets, have relatively few single patient rooms; indeed most critical care units comprise open-plan multi-bed units. These multi-occupancy units were designed to be open-plan as this gives rise to excellent visibility of patients for clinical staff which, in turn, is thought to result in better standards of clinical care. Unfortunately such open-plan (high visibility) units have now been demonstrated to have high rates of HAI transmission.


The key HAI problem facing USA hospitals is the-tough-to-eradicate spore-forming C. difficile – and C. difficile
infection. However in hospitals in the developing markets such as the Middle East, Asia and Latin America (and mnay in Eastern Europe) the key HAI challenge comprises highly resistant (and increasingly pan-drug resistant (i.e. untreatable)) Gram-negative bacteria such as Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moreover, the clinical problems associated with these extensively resistant Gram-negative pathogens are exacerbated by the open-plan, multi-bed topology of their critical care units.

The perfect combination: Pod and BQ-50

Bioquell Pod

Picture1.jpgBioquell’s Pod technology enables open-plan, multi-bed units to be converted rapidly and cost-effectively into single patient rooms. Each Pod represents a tailor-made single patient room - as no two hospital bed spaces are ever the same - which also incorporates HEPA filtered negative (or positive) airflows and specialist lighting. The Pods can also be ‘bioquelled’ – i.e. decontaminated using Bioquell’s unique hydrogen peroxide vapour (HPV) technology. Critically, Bioquell is able to erect Pods silently and in a matter of hours – without the need for the hospital to close the unit (which minimises disruption and lost revenues). More information on the Bioquell Pod can be obtained by clicking here

Bioquell BQ-50 

The BQ-50 is Bioquell’s latest HPV technology which has been designed specifically for use in hospitals. The BQ-50 incorporates the key elements of Bioquell’s HPV technology and by extension the substantial body of scientific evidence which, based on research with leading hospitals in Europe and the USA, shows that ‘bioquelling’ rooms leads to a significant reduction in the HAI rate. (For example, a study from Johns Hopkins demonstrated a 64% reduction.) But the BQ-50 has a number of key advantages over previous generations of HPV equipment from Bioquell:

  • much smaller units;
  • much faster decontamination cycles – with the average single patient room now ‘bioquelled’ in an hour; and
  • much easier to use – with fully automated cycles and wireless controls.

More information on the BQ-50 can be found by clicking on this link.

Winning combination: Pod & BQ-50

If you are worried about your hospital’s HAI rates – particularly if you are a US hospital battling high CDI rates - or you have been tasked with preparing to limit the transmission of a resistant Gram-negative or virus, then deploying Pods with BQ-50 is a unique and unbeatable combination. It will also be rather more than effective than a gin & tonic – however appealing that combination may seem when the problem first presents itself.